Q&A About Hearing Loss

In Hearing Loss by Michael L. Schneller, HIS

Michael L. Schneller, HIS
Latest posts by Michael L. Schneller, HIS (see all)

“One who asks question remains a fool for five minutes. One who does not ask, remains a fool forever,” states an ancient proverb. The number one way that people put themselves at a disadvantage is by being too afraid to ask questions. Humanity is built on the passing of information through generations. It is unrealistic to believe we can simply gain everything we need to know from first hand experience.

This especially pertains to hearing loss, where it is incredibly important to ask as many questions as possible. Your hearing health is not something to be ambivalent about. The more you know about your hearing health the better you can participate in your daily life. Below are frequently asked questions about hearing that can be helpful to most.

Why is it so Important to Treat My Hearing Loss

Nearly 1 in 10 Americans know their hearing isn’t as good as it used to be, but more than half have never gotten their hearing checked. Hearing loss can lead to a number of social, emotional, and mental repercussions if left untreated. When people choose to go untreated, they are risking their relationships, careers, and health. Untreated hearing loss can result in cognitive impairment as certain parts of the brain deteriorate without aural stimulation and the brain overcompensates for gaps in hearing, leading to problems with concentration and fatigue. There are also indications that untreated hearing loss can accelerate dementia. In order to avoid the consequences of untreated hearing loss, it’s important to get a professional diagnosis and treatment plan. Most of the time the best treatment for hearing loss are hearing aids. These devices have come a long way in recent years. Even people with mild hearing problems can benefit from wearing them.

Why is it so Important to Treat My Hearing Loss

Nearly 1 in 10 Americans know their hearing isn’t as good as it used to be, but more than half have never gotten their hearing checked. Hearing loss can lead to a number of social, emotional, and mental repercussions if left untreated. When people choose to go untreated, they are risking their relationships, careers, and health. Untreated hearing loss can result in cognitive impairment as certain parts of the brain deteriorate without aural stimulation and the brain overcompensates for gaps in hearing, leading to problems with concentration and fatigue. There are also indications that untreated hearing loss can accelerate dementia. In order to avoid the consequences of untreated hearing loss, it’s important to get a professional diagnosis and treatment plan. Most of the time the best treatment for hearing loss are hearing aids. These devices have come a long way in recent years. Even people with mild hearing problems can benefit from wearing them.

Do I really need two hearing aids?

If you’ve had your hearing evaluated by a qualified hearing professional and they have recommended two hearing aids as treatment, then you should invest in two hearing aids. They are not trying to up sell you. Your brain depends on both ears to determine the location sounds are coming from. Since most hearing loss is binaural (involves both ears), wearing two hearing aids gives your brain the information it needs so you won’t strain to hear. This can leave you more energy to enjoy life.

What exactly are Cochlear Implants and should they be used

A cochlear implant is an electronic medical device that replaces the function of the damaged inner ear. Unlike hearing aids, which make sounds louder, cochlear implants do the work of damaged parts of the inner ear (cochlea) to provide sound signals to the brain. Cochlear implants can help people who have moderate to profound hearing loss in one or both ears, have received little or no benefit from hearing aids or score 65% or less on sentence recognition tests done by hearing professional in the ear to be implanted

Are there any natural remedies for hearing loss

Unfortunately, despite what you might read on Internet blogs, the answer is “no.” This is because the delicate hair cells of the inner ear, which are responsible for translating the noise to your outer ears, do not regenerate. Once they have been damaged from exposure to excessive noise, illness or ototoxic medications you lose the ability to hear permanently.

How can I protect my hearing for the future

Protect your hearing from excessive noise louder than 85 decibels, such as concerts, fireworks and other explosions, outdoor lawn equipment, and loud power tools. Wear protective hearing gear whenever you know you’ll be in a noisy situation. Keep personal electronic listening devices, televisions and radio tuned below 60% of the possible volume,

Don’t put anything into your ear canal that might puncture your eardrum. For the most part, ears are self-cleaning and only require gentle washing with a warm, soapy cloth. Ask a medical professional for help if sound is muffled and you feel there is an obstruction in your ear canal.

Who should I see for a hearing test?

That one’s easy! Contact us at Focus Hearing to set up an appointment for a hearing test. We can answer all your questions about hearing loss and create a customized plan to keep your hearing at it’s highest potential.